A Day of Sanctuary

Services

Sunday - 9:15 AM Sunday School, 10:30 AM Worship Service

by: Denise Robinson

09/29/2021

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I have been reading Sacred Rhythms by Ruth Haley Barton (a new author find). In her book, she discusses setting aside a day every now and then for a "sanctuary in time." This is a day of rest and restoration that is actually planned out in advance, not a decision made on the spur of the moment. So, what is her recommendation?


Pick out a day in advance when you can truly cease work and not be disturbed. Let your family and friends know that this day will be your sanctuary day. If you want a family member or friend to be with you during part of your day, tell them in advance what the day will be like and what you want of them. You do not have to spend the day alone, but they should be part of your reflection rather than a distraction. You may need their help to keep on track. 

What to exclude from this day: work, "retail therapy" (online or in a store), worry (thinking about what else you should - or could - be doing), social media.

What to include: activities that rest the body, replenish the spirit, and restore the soul. These vary from person to person. Resting your body might include taking a nap or a hike, sitting in the sun, staring at a candle, taking a bubble bath, eating a favorite food. Replenishing your spirit might include reading a book, talking about some aspect of your life with that special family member or friend, listening to music. doing something creative (and out of the norm for you). Restoring the soul turns toward the spiritual and might include prayer, quiet reflection, planning your own worship service, journaling about your faith, writing a letter. 

Above all, remember these words: "The sabbath was made for human beings, not human beings for the sabbath." (Mark 2:27). Don't expect to get it right the first time, but perhaps this is something you might want to plan for one day a month or as your schedule permits. 

What do you think of Barton's suggestion? Might it work for you?
I have been reading Sacred Rhythms by Ruth Haley Barton (a new author find). In her book, she discusses setting aside a day every now and then for a "sanctuary in time." This is a day of rest and restoration that is actually planned out in advance, not a decision made on the spur of the moment. So, what is her recommendation?


Pick out a day in advance when you can truly cease work and not be disturbed. Let your family and friends know that this day will be your sanctuary day. If you want a family member or friend to be with you during part of your day, tell them in advance what the day will be like and what you want of them. You do not have to spend the day alone, but they should be part of your reflection rather than a distraction. You may need their help to keep on track. 

What to exclude from this day: work, "retail therapy" (online or in a store), worry (thinking about what else you should - or could - be doing), social media.

What to include: activities that rest the body, replenish the spirit, and restore the soul. These vary from person to person. Resting your body might include taking a nap or a hike, sitting in the sun, staring at a candle, taking a bubble bath, eating a favorite food. Replenishing your spirit might include reading a book, talking about some aspect of your life with that special family member or friend, listening to music. doing something creative (and out of the norm for you). Restoring the soul turns toward the spiritual and might include prayer, quiet reflection, planning your own worship service, journaling about your faith, writing a letter. 

Above all, remember these words: "The sabbath was made for human beings, not human beings for the sabbath." (Mark 2:27). Don't expect to get it right the first time, but perhaps this is something you might want to plan for one day a month or as your schedule permits. 

What do you think of Barton's suggestion? Might it work for you?
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